Monday, 27 June 2011

Oscar Wilde And The Vampire Murders

Unfolding in the spring of 1890, 'Oscar Wilde And The Vampire Murders' is the fourth instalment in Gyles Brandreth’s series featuring writer/poet/wit/dandy/philosopher Oscar Wilde as a highly sophisticated, eloquent and, in typical “Wilde” fashion, self-indulgent sleuth.

Aided in his investigations by fellow literary luminaries Arthur Conan Doyle, Bram Stoker and his eventual biographer, Robert Sherard, the Philosopher of Aestheticism finds himself irrevocably embroiled in a series of nasty murders, the grim details of which suggest they were carried out by a vampire…

Amidst the lavish locations and copious amounts of Perrier-Jou√ęt decadently guzzled by Wilde and co, is an irresistibly macabre mystery which will undoubtedly please those who enjoy classic murder-mystery  whodunits in the vein of Agatha Christie or indeed, Conan Doyle’s own Sherlock Holmes.

To read my full review, head over to Fangoria.

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